News Of The Day
71729dea0cb901f8fc3004211a9541a3image_shadow.png

2 US soldiers killed fighting Isis in Afghanistan region hit by 'mother of all bombs'

27 Apr 2017 10:32:00

Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis said that the US personnel were killed overnight in the Nangarhar province, on the border with Pakistan. Pentagon spokesman Adam Stump confirmed to The Independent that the soldiers were killed while fighting Isis-Khorosan, the local affiliate of the terror group. This is the "same general area" - southern Nangarhar province - where the massive ordnance air blast, dubbed the "mother of all bombs" (MOAB) was dropped earlier this month, Mr Stump said.

c8104a464ccb48f69d8c4169feb37436.jpgimage_shadow.png

Slain trooper's young sons in court as killer gets death

27 Apr 2017 17:05:41

MILFORD, Pa. (AP) — With his victim's two young sons in court for the first time, a gunman who shot and killed a Pennsylvania trooper was formally sentenced to death Thursday, one day after a jury determined he should receive a lethal injection for the ambush at a state police barracks.

44ecf1de2b6d2121d928c3d02e50224fimage_shadow.png

U.S. Probes Into Trump’s Russia Links, Kremlin Meddling Gain Two Heavyweights

26 Apr 2017 13:16:27

The Senate investigation gains a former NSA lawyer. The FBI probe gets a veteran prosecutor.

2017-04-26T174417Z_2_LYNXMPED3P17G_RTROPTP_2_USA-ELECTION.JPGimage_shadow.png

Ann Coulter cancels her speech at Berkeley amid safety dispute

26 Apr 2017 13:44:17

"There will be no speech," Coulter wrote in an email to Reuters on Wednesday in which she also criticized two conservative groups who had originally sponsored the event, saying they were no longer supporting her. Coulter, one of the best-known conservative commentators in the United States, had been scheduled to give a speech critical of pro-immigration policies on Thursday. Last week, Berkeley officials said there was no safe venue at the campus on that date.

a83eb12267c943d3a63b0e222385c471image_shadow.png

A Growing -- and Deadly -- Problem on America’s Roads

26 Apr 2017 12:17:29

For the first time, drugged driving is to blame for more traffic fatalities involving drivers than drunk driving, a new report reveals.

4c9f4eb669ae3a6caa91289408c11e6cimage_shadow.png

The BMW M550d xDrive Touring Is the Quad-Turbo Diesel Wagon of Your Dreams

27 Apr 2017 14:15:35

And no, it's probably not coming to America.

8aeab17e622c337d540e18b200cee569image_shadow.png

Sobering visualizations reveal how sea level rise could transform cities in your lifetime

26 Apr 2017 15:46:08

Until recently, it seemed that we would be able to manage global warming-induced sea level rise through the end of the century. It would be problematic, of course, but manageable, particularly in industrialized nations like the U.S. However, troubling indications from the Greenland and Antarctic Ice Sheets show that melting is taking place faster than previously thought and that entire glaciers — if not portions of the ice sheets themselves — are destabilizing. This has scientists increasingly worried that the consensus sea level rise estimates are too conservative. With sea level rise, as with other climate impacts, the uncertainties tend to skew toward the more severe end of the scale. So, it's time to consider some worst-case scenarios. SEE ALSO: Trump White House reveals it's 'not familiar' with well-studied costs of global warming Recently, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) published an extreme high-end sea level rise scenario, showing 10 to 12 feet of sea level rise by 2100 around the U.S., compared to the previously published global average — which is closer to 8 feet — in that time period.  The research and journalism group Climate Central took this projection and plotted out the stark ramifications in painstaking, and  terrifying, detail.  The bottom line finding?  "By the end of the century, oceans could submerge land [that's] home to more than 12 million Americans and $2 trillion in property," according to Ben Strauss, who leads the sea level rise program at Climate Central.  Here's what major cities would look like with so much sea level rise: New York CityImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL New Orleans: Gone.Image: CLIMATE CENTRAL San Francisco International AirportImage: CLIMATE CENTRAL Bienvenido a Miami.Image: CLIMATE CENTRALIn an online report, Climate Central states that the impacts of such a high amount of sea level rise "would be devastating."  For example, Cape Canaveral, which is a crown jewel for NASA and now the private sector space industry, would be swallowed up by the Atlantic. Major universities, including MIT, would be underwater, as would President Trump's "southern White House" of Mar-a-Lago. In the West, San Francisco would be hard-hit, with San Francisco International Airport completely submerged. "More than 99 percent of today’s population in 252 coastal towns and cities would have their homes submerged, and property of more than half the population in 479 additional communities would also be underwater," the analysis, which has not been peer-reviewed, found.  Image: climate centralIn New York City, the
average high tide would be a staggering 2 feet higher than the flood level experienced during Hurricane Sandy. More than 800,000 people would be flooded out of New York City alone.  Although the findings pertain to sea level rise through the end of the century, in reality sea levels would keep rising long after that, with a total increase of about 30 feet by 2200 for all coastal states, Climate Central found.  As for how likely this extreme scenario really is, here's what the report says:  "The extreme scenario is considered unlikely, but it is plausible. NOAA’s report and Antarctic research suggest that deep and rapid cuts to heat-trapping pollution would greatly reduce its chances."  More specifically, the NOAA projection says this high-end outlook has just a 0.1 percent chance of occurring under a scenario in which we keep emitting greenhouse gases at about the current rate. While a 1-in-1,000 chance outcome might seem nearly impossible to occur, recent events suggest otherwise.  For example, Hurricane Sandy slammed into the Mid-Atlantic in 2012 while following a track that was virtually unprecedented in storm history. In addition, California is estimated to have had just a 1 percent chance of climbing out of its deep drought in a one to two-year period, and it did just that this winter.  Also, Donald Trump is president, people.  Robert Kopp, a sea level rise researcher at Rutgers University, whose projections formed the basis of the NOAA scenarios, said it's difficult to put exact odds on the extreme scenario.  "I would say that our knowledge about marine ice-sheet instability is too deeply uncertain for us to answer that question right now," Kopp said in an email. "We can come up with a physically plausible pathway that gets us to 2.5 meters [or 8.2 feet], we know it is more likely under higher emissions, but we don't have a good way of putting a probability on it." A paper published in the journal
Nature in March found that if emissions of global warming pollutants peak in the next few years and are then reduced quickly thereafter, then there is a good chance that the melting of the Antarctic Ice Sheet would be drastically curtailed.  However, with the U.S., which is the second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, backing away from making significant cuts under the Paris Climate Agreement, adhering to such an ambitious timetable is looking less realistic.  Image: climate centralIn order for NOAA's extreme scenario, and therefore Climate Central's maps, to turn into reality, there would need to be decades more of sustained high emissions of greenhouse gases plus more melting from Antarctica than is currently anticipated.  However, recent studies have raised questions about Antarctica's stability, as mild ocean waters eat away at floating ice shelves from below, freeing up glaciers well inland to flow faster into the sea.  "What's new is that we used to think 6- to 7 feet was the max *plausible* or *possible* sea level rise this century, and now we've roughly doubled that," Strauss said in an email. "The new Antarctic science says it's plausible."  "If you were to survey ice sheet experts today, instead of something like 5 to 10 years ago, I suspect you'd get a significantly higher probability than 0.1 percent," he said.  A study published in the journal
Nature Climate Change last week found that sea level rise could prompt a wave of internal migration within the U.S., especially as people move from the hardest-hit states such as Florida, Louisiana and New York. It's long been known that Florida is ground zero for sea level rise impacts, but the Climate Central projections are even more pessimistic. The report shows that a whopping 5.6 million Floridians would be at risk before the end of the century under an extreme sea level rise scenario, about double the amount simulated in the study last week. WATCH: Serene underwater footage shows whale's-eye view of Antarctica

d8d474736f2c5e2f5c11b01d7c86cdc3image_shadow.png

Missing Toddler Found Dead After She Vanished While Playing in Yard

27 Apr 2017 11:27:00

One-year-old Semaj Crosby was found dead in a Joliet, Ill., home.

c042f14f602835891ab175ea1af5e27a7e2b9a63.jpgimage_shadow.png

Le Pen says voters must choose 'for or against' France

27 Apr 2017 17:55:46

Far-right presidential candidate Marine Le Pen delivered a ferocious attack Thursday on her globalist rival Emmanuel Macron, saying voters faced a choice "for or against France". The candidates' starkly differing visions on France's future are at the heart of the May 7 election run-off -- with Macron, a 39-year-old former banker embracing free trade and the EU, while Le Pen wants to seal France's borders and quit the euro. "The country Mr Macron wants is no longer France, it's a space, a wasteland, a trading room where there are only consumers and producers," Le Pen told a cheering crowd of some 4,000 supporters in the Riviera city of Nice, a rightwing stronghold.

default_news_picture.pngimage_shadow.png

Battling ISIS in Hatra, Iraq, and more: April 26 in photos

26 Apr 2017 16:09:34

Iraqi paramilitary troops fire toward Islamic State militants during a battle on the outskirts of the ancient city of Hatra, near Mosul, Iraq; the robes of Pope Francis are blown over his head by a gust of wind as he delivers his homily during the weekly audience in St. Peter’s Square in Vatican City; and demonstrators in Minsk, Belarus, mark the 31st anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster.

Contact Info
Agent
Bill Boeckelman

Associate Real Estate Broker

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

6 Cedar Street
Dobbs Ferry  New York 10522

Licensed In NY and CT 914-681-5792 Specializing In Successful, Efficient, Problem-Free Home Sales

Contact Info
Agent
William Boeckelman

Associate Real Estate Broker

Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

6 Cedar Street
Dobbs Ferry  NY 10522

Licensed In NY and CT 914-681-5792 Specializing In Successful, Efficient, Problem-Free Home Sales